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What is Halotherapy?

Halotherapy, taken from the Greek word halos meaning “salt”, is a natural treatment that has been dated back to the twelfth century. Halotherapy, also known as salt therapy, is a holistic type of treatment that mimics that of a salt cave. Dry salt is heated, grind up into micro-sized particles and then dispersed into the room for inhalation with the use of a halogenerator.

Why Halotherapy?

From pollens and toxins, to pollution, smog and airborne diseases, our society has never been faced with such a growing epidemic of respiratory ailments. Halotherapy, also know as salt therapy, may be beneficial in helping the side effects that come with such conditions. It has been researched for centuries in Europe and has been proven as a safe alternative and compliments other treatments.

How does Salt Therapy work?

Most people are familiar with ‘wet’ salt therapy, Whether you have gargled with salt water, put salt in a bath, had a saline solution treatment or used a Nettie pot, wet salt has its benefits; but dry salt is different and the drier the salt the better. At Saltastic we use what is called a halogenerator in each of our salt rooms and we heat up the salt prior to dispersing it into the rooms. Heat ensures that all moisture is evaporated so when it is inhaled, the salt particles can do their best job.

What happens during a salt session?

During your 45-minute salt session you will be seated in a zero-gravity chair and simply breath in the salt. Salt will be dispersed for the entire 45 minutes while you simply relax and enjoy the soft music. You are encouraged to bring a book, phones are not permitted in the salt room.

Am I alone in the Salt Room?

In our adult salt room, we accommodate up to 5 people per session.

In our private salt room, you have the option of being by yourself or with a spouse/friend.

What should be worn when receiving therapy in The Salt Rooms?

Basically, you want to be comfortable. Loose clothing that you can relax in is best. If you have a skin condition you may want to wear something that exposes more skin. For those without skin conditions such as (dermatitis, eczema or psoriasis)…these conditions are not contagious and cannot be passed from one person the other. The salt in the air will not harm or be noticeable on your clothes. You will be given disposable shoe coverings to slip over your feet or shoes. For children we request that they come in clean clothing and socks and that long hair be pulled back in a ponytail.

If you need your inhaler or other medical device, please bring it with you into the session.

In which cases should Salt Therapy be avoided?

Salt Therapy is not recommended for individuals with the following conditions: existence of cancer, any kind of infectious disease, acute respiratory disease, cardiac insufficiency, cardiac and coronary diseases, COPD with 3rd stage of chronic lung insufficiency, coughing of blood/bleeding, infections accompanied by fever, high blood pressure/hypertension in IIB stage, any form or stage of tuberculosis, intoxication and chronic kidney disease. We encourage everyone to discuss salt therapy wth their healthcare professional if they have concerns.

What about the concern that salt is bad for you?

Consuming too much salt is linked to high blood pressure. With salt therapy, you are inhaling a dry salt aerosol which only enters your respiratory system not your digestion tract. The salt particles are so fine that even if you were to eat that amount it would not pose a risk to your health.

How will I feel after the first session?

Guests may feel a tickle in their throat, causing a slight cough, as well as a runny nose due to airways being opened and mucus being expelled. Depending on symptoms and severity, a cough may linger as airways expand and the body clears mucus, allergens and bacteria.

How sterile is the salt room – could someone pick up germs?

Salt naturally absorbs bacteria. Salt is dispersed every hour on the hour. Chairs, tables, toys, books, and magazines are sanitized after each session. Saltastic also has an ionization system installed on their HVAC system which kills bacteria in the air in the entire spa.

What kind of salt is used?

We use 100% Pharmaceutical Grade Salt (sodium chloride) in our halogenerators.

What is the difference between salt therapy and sea air?

Salt is anti-inflammatory, meaning it absorbs moisture. Sea air is not as potent because it is already moist, which takes away its strong ability to heal. When you breathe in dry salt aerosol in our treatment rooms, the particles line your airways and draw out the fluid from the inflamed airway. This fluid, now mixed with the salt goes to work on cleaning the walls of the airways. One session in a salt room is equivalent to three (3) days at beach.

What will my experience be like?

When you arrive at Saltastic, you will be directed to check in and fill out our client intake form. We will then bring you on a tour of our facility. Clients are advised to remove footwear, disposable shoe covers are provided and must be worn once in the salt rooms, clients just sit, relax and breathe. Our staff can answer any questions you may have.

Can electronics be brought into the salt rooms?

Electronics are not allowed during sessions. Salt rooms are full of negative ions, which have “clarity effect”, reduce stress, headaches, lethargy, depression and increase energy, mental alertness, and overall sense of well being. Electronics are positively charged which would defeat the purpose of the negative ions.

Still have questions?

Email info@saltastic.ca or give us a call 613.215.0644

RESEARCH & SCIENCE

The SALT THERAPY ASSOCIATION  has compiled several research articles and studies posted below. You can breathe easy knowing that dry salt therapy has been backed by science.

1) The use of Halotherapy for the rehabilitation of patients with acute bronchitis and a protracted and recurrent course. (Borisenko LV, Chervinskaia AV, Stepanova NG, Luk’ian VS, Goncharova VA, Pokhodzeĭ IV, Krivitskaia VZ, Vishniakova LA, Pokhaznikova MA, Faustova ME,) 1995 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7785211


2) The use of an artificial microclimate chamber in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive lung diseases (Chernenkov RA, Chernenkova EA, Zhukov GV.) 1997 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9424823


3) Halotherapy in the combined treatment of chronic bronchitis patients (Maev EZ, Vinogradov NV.) 1999 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10439712


4) The scientific validation and outlook for the practical use of halo-aerosol therapy (Chervinskaia AV.) 2000 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11094875


5) Halotherapy for treatment of respiratory diseases. (Chervinskaya AV1, Zilber NA). 2000 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10161255


6) Effectiveness of Halotherapy of chronic bronchitis patients (Abdrakhmanova LM, Farkhutdinov UR, Farkhutdinov RR.) 2000 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11197648


7) Effects of Halotherapy on free radical oxidation in patients with chronic bronchitis (Farkhutdinov UR, Abdrakhmanova LM, Farkhutdinov RR.) 2000 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11210350


8) Efficacy of therapeutic use of ultrasound and sinusoidal modulated currents combed with Halotherapy in patient with occupational toxic-dust bronchitis (Roslaia NA, Likhacheva EI, Shchekoldin PI) 2001 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11530404


9) The effect of salt chamber treatment on bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthmatics. (Hedman J1, Hugg T, Sandell J, Haahtela T.) 2006 Finland
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16629791


10) The use of Halotherapy for the health improvement in children at institutions of general education (Khan MA, Chervinskaia AV, Mikitchenko NA) 2012 Russia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22908472


11) Double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial on the efficacy of Aerosal in the treatment of sub-obstructive adenotonsillar hypertrophy and related diseases. (Gelardi M1, Iannuzzi L, Greco Miani A, Cazzaniga S, Naldi L, De Luca C, Quaranta N) 2013 Italy
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24041858


12) Salt caves as simulation of natural environment and significance of Halotherapy. (Zajac J1, Bojar I2, Helbin J1, Kolarzyk E1, Owoc A3) 2014 Poland
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24738510


13) The Therapy with Sodium Chloride Dry Aerosols. (B. Opriţa, C. Pandrea, B. Dinu, B. Aignătoaie) 2010 Romania
https://salttherapyassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/STA-Therapy-With-Sodium-Chloride.pdf


14) Respiratory Hygiene in Health Resort Medicine. (Chervinskaya Alina V.) 2006 Turkey
https://salttherapyassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/STA-Respiratory-Hygiene-in-Health-Resort.pdf


15) Halotherapy of Respiratory Diseases. (Chervinskaya A.) 2003 Russia
https://salttherapyassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/STA-Halotherapy-for-Respiratory-Diseases.pdf


16) Halotherapy, a Naturopathic Breath of Fresh Air. (Czeranko S) 2007 United States
https://salttherapyassociation.org/wp-content/uploads/STA-Halotherapy-a-Naturopathic-Breath.pdf